Skip to main content

I’m Thankful For The Boston Celtics (It’s not why you think)

The positive impact the Boston Celtics had on one Canadian youngster



Thanksgiving is a time when everyone reflects on what they are thankful for. Like most, I am thankful for my family, friends, health & job. I have a great life, but in my thanks I cannot forget the one team that helped me through some of my darkest times: the Boston Celtics. 

Growing up in Montreal in the early 80’s was a treasure trove for sports fans.  The Montreal Expos were beginning their run as the winningest team in the 80’s while the Montreal Canadiens were perennial Stanley Cup contenders. For sports heroes a kid could chose from the likes of Guy Lafleur, Ken Dryden, Gary Carter, Andre Dawson, Steve Rogers. It was awesome. However, on Sunday afternoons in the winter, after football season had ended, there was nothing for a sports fan to watch. 

My parents were going through a bitter divorce in 1980. On Sundays it would be my fathers time to see my brother & I.  He would pick us up and drive us to see his parents. Like clockwork we’d be sent down to the basement while the three of them would yell and scream at each other for reasons that for the life of me I can’t recall. My younger brother would cry. I would have no words to console him so I’d try to find anything on TV to calm him (and me) down. 

My grandparents didn’t have cable so we’d be stuck watching whatever was on CTV or CBC, usually Wide World of Sports (the most boring sports television program of all time) but one afternoon I decided to see what was on the snowy channel, WCAX TV, channel 3, North Pole - Burlington. They were a CBS affiliate. As the picture got clearer I recall seeing and hearing the announcers talk about a magician with a basketball, Pistol Pete Maravich. The game hadn’t started and they were all raving about Maravich and the wizardry he could do with a basketball. My brother and I picked up 2 pillows from the sofa and tried moving them around our backs, passing them between our legs - we were forgetting what was happening upstairs. 

We were playing the Detroit Pistons that Sunday afternoon. This was one of the first basketball games I’d ever seen. To my disappointment Pistol Pete hardly played even though the game was very close (Celtics were losing at halftime) but then something amazing happened, I started to notice a rookie named Larry Bird. Every time he touched the ball something amazing happened. Each possession was pure magic. Three point shots, behind the back passes, scoring baskets while being hounded by absolutely everyone on the visitors. I was in awe. The man would not let the Celtics lose. I had found a new hero to get me through those rough times. My brother never developed the love for basketball like I did but we’d still spend every Sunday afternoon playing with those basement pillows pretending that we were the Boston Celtics and I was Larry Bird. A life long love affair had begun. 

Steven Mayer 



Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The Elm Street Nightmare

 A true-and-suspenseful horror tale of haunting, homicides and the hunt for triple-murderer, Daniel Laplante - as told by the cops that were there By Lt. Thomas Lane (Ret.) and Off. Steven Bezanson (Ret.) Daniel Laplante - cold, calm, clever, calculating- Photo: YouTube   Elm Street  surfaces on four occasions in the Laplante saga: 1.) He  resided on Elm Street  in Townsend, Massachusetts 2.) He  kidnapped a woman  at gunpoint on  Elm Street, Pepperell , Massachusetts 3.) He was arrested and transported to Massachusetts State Police Barracks on Elm Street in Concord . 3.) He was  tried, convicted   and sentenced for the murders at  Superior Court , corner of  Elm Stree t and Gorham Street, Lowell, Massachusetts. When evil and cleverness reside in the same mind, the stage is often set for true horror. Such was the case with triple-murderer, Daniel Laplante . As a 16-year old , he quickly transitioned from: Minor thefts and breaking into homes To: Taunting and threatening a father and

Sign the Petition! Let's honor Tommy Heinsohn

  No longtime Celtics fan can watch games this year without a somewhat heavy heart. For the last 50 plus years, we have been blessed as a franchise to have Tommy Heinsohn, Mr. Celtic himself, as a part of the organization. Whether it be as a player, coach, or commentator, Tommy has been an instrumental figure for the green, and his presence is missed on every broadcast. Nobody embodied what it meant to be a Celtic more than Tommy, and I know I miss his energy and ferocity every time Scal claims the refs "made the right call" against the Cs. While Tommy obviously belongs on the Mount Rushmore of Celtics, he is often overlooked in his place among the greats of NBA history. Looking back upon his life, one would be hard pressed to find someone with a bigger impact on NBA basketball than Mr. Celtic. For those who are unfamiliar, let's do a quick review. Tommy is one of 2 people to be inducted into the Hall of Fame as both a player and coach (the other being the indomitable Len

Using trade exception to acquire Aaron Gordon needs consideration

The Orlando Magic's Aaron Gordon was taken fourth-overall in the 2014 NBA draft, two spots before Boston picked Marcus Smart at #6. I felt at the time that Danny Ainge would have taken Gordon with the sixth pick if the 6'8" power forward was still on the board. Well now, with a $28.5 million trade exception in his hands, it may be time to consider adding the super-athletic wing. Here's why: Brad Stevens feels you can't have enough mid-sized wings Brad Stevens does not favor the "little guys" because they often get mis-matched on defense by taller opponents. He also is not fond of the old-school, big centers. In his mind, they just can't be effective on his switching, perimeter defensive strategies. Gordon's salary fits the trade exception Aaron is set to earn $18.1 million this season and $16.4 million in the 2021-22 season. His salary was front-loaded, and that relatively-low $16.1 million figure kicks in when Jayson Tatum's max contract goes